Saving the Dead Sea

The Dead Sea is drying up at an alarming rate.


The relentless degradation is not as a result of climate change or drought, but rather due to decades of government neglect and mismanagement. The Dead Sea Works, a mineral mining company, is pumping unrestricted amounts of water without water extraction permits or government supervision. 

 

Adam Teva V'Din is working hard to preserve this vital natural resource and mitigate the rate of decline in the short and long term.

Dead Sea dries up

Dead Sea dries up

Sinkholes at the Dead Sea

“Visitors can see for themselves the drastic changes in landscape, retreating shores, sinkholes and extensive damage to agriculture land and roads. 30% of this damage is caused by the Dead Sea Works” – Sarit Caspi-Oron, water scientist

Short term: Limiting water extraction

Short term: Limiting water extraction

Dead Sea Works pumps unlimited amounts of water.

LIMITING WATER EXTRACTED FROM THE DEAD SEA AND IMPROVING GOVERNMENT OVERSIGHT

We turned to the special Water Tribunal to limit the amount of water extracted from the Dead Sea and improve oversight in order to correct the imbalance of water extracted vs. water replenished.

 

Following the Tribunal’s rejection of our petition under the claim that the Dead Sea Franchise Law invalidates the Water Law’s restriction of water extracted, we submitted an appeal to the High Court of Justice.

 

In our appeal we called on the Court to overturn the Tribunal’s decision and requested the reexamination of the Dead Sea Works’ Production License in order to prevent further degradation of the Dead Sea and landscape.

Long term: Rehabilitating the Dead Sea

Long term: Rehabilitating the Dead Sea

Adam Teva V'Din attorneys and scientists at work in the courts.

REHABILITATING THE DEAD SEA BEFORE AND AFTER EXPIRATION OF DEAD SEA WORKS' LICENSE IN 2030

 

In 2030, the Dead Sea Work's permit to mine Dead Sea minerals will expire. The years preceding the end of the franchise agreement are an opportunity to fundamentally change the way in which the Dead Sea is managed and develop and implement a long-term rehabilitation plan.

 

Adam Teva V'Din has recommended a series of important steps which need to be taken before and after 2030 in order to prevent further decline and work towards rehabilitating the Dead Sea.

 

These recommendations include developing a long-term rehabilitation plan with oversight mechanisms to regulate the mining of Dead Sea minerals before the permit expires and ceasing all mining operations from the northern basin once the permit has ended.

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